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Fossil Mammals in Slovenia - Mastodon

Fossil Mammals in Slovenia - Mastodon


Datum izida:3/22/2018 11:00:00 PM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Mastodon
Tisk:Agencija za komercijalnu djelatnost d.o.o., Zagreb, Hrvaška
Izvedba:4-colour offset in sheets of 25 stamps
Papir:Tullis Russell Chancellor Litho PVA RMS GUM, 102 g/m2
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Zobčanje:Comb 14 : 14
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Fossil Mammals in Slovenia - Mastodon

<p><strong>The mastodon – the ancient giant of the forests </strong></p><p>Two million years ago the landscape of Slovenia was very different from the way we see it today. The soaring Alps in the west and the forested landscape with patches of marsh and endless plains in the east were an ideal environment for large proboscideans and other mammals. One of the last European mastodons – of the <em>Anancus arvernensis</em> species – would periodically graze in forest clearings here. <em>Anancus arvernensis</em> inhabited a large part of Europe, appearing in the late Miocene and surviving until the start of the Pleistocene. Some other species inhabited parts of Asia and Africa. The <em>Anancus</em> was very similar to today's elephants, although with much longer, straight tusks and different-shaped teeth. </p><p>Fossil remains have been found in Slovenia in the Šalek Valley, near Slovenska Bistrica and in many parts of the Slovenske Gorice, Čentibske Gorice and Goričko hill regions. Teeth are the most frequently discovered remains. The best-known site for such finds was discovered near the village of Škala, not far from Velenje, where parts of a skeleton and tusks were also unearthed. The new postage stamp depicts a mastodon tooth discovered more than 70 years ago in a gravel pit close to Sveti Andraž in the Slovenske Gorice hill region. This large tooth (a molar) is from the lower jaw, as also indicated by its strong root. The age of the tooth is not entirely clear, but it is likely to have belonged to an animal that grazed this hill area, covered with sparse woodland, in the late Pliocene. Changes in the environment in the early Pleistocene, approximately two million years ago, also contributed to the extinction of the last mastodon to roam across the territory of present-day Slovenia. </p><p>Today the mastodon's tooth is on display at the Natural History Museum of Slovenia. The stamp also incorporates a form of augmented reality&#58; use the HP Reveal app to scan the stamp on a mobile device and launch an X-ray video of the cross section of the mastodon's tooth. </p><p>&#160;</p><p>Matija Križnar, senior curator, palaeontologist</p><p>Natural History Museum of Slovenia</p>