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New Year C - Orange with Cloves

New Year C - Orange with Cloves


Datum izida:11/3/2016 11:00:00 PM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Orange with Cloves
Tisk:Sheet: Zrinski d.d., Čakovec, Croatia; Booklet: Oriental Security Printing Solutions, Bahrain
Izvedba:4-colour offset in self-adhesive sheets of 50 stamps and self-adhesive booklets of 12 stamps
Papir:Sheet: 100 g/m2 self-adhesive; Booklet: 100 g/m2 self-adhesive
Velikost:
Zobčanje:Serpentine die cut
Ilustracija:Matjaž Učakar
Fotografija:
Pošta:
Poštna številka:

New Year C - Orange with Cloves

<p><strong>Gvidon Birolla, Epiphany Wassailers, 1939</strong><br></p><p>Wassailing was a very widespread tradition in Slovenia during<br>the Christmas season and at the end of the old year and the start<br>of the new one. The tradition involved groups of wassailers going<br>from house to house and reciting greetings, singing wassailing<br>songs or carols and even staging brief dramatic presentations<br>as they offered good wishes for health, fortune and fertility<br>in the new year to the inhabitants of the village or district.<br>The wassailing tradition has its roots in medieval religious<br>observances and is first mentioned in the context of Slovenia by<br>Primož Trubar in as early as 1575. The tradition of wassailing at<br>Christmas died out relatively early and gave way to or merged<br>with Twelfth Night or Epiphany wassailing. The wassailers were<br>usually men. There was also a social, charitable aspect to these<br>processions from house to house, since wassailers were often<br>members of poorer families and wassailing was an opportunity<br>for them to receive gifts to help them survive the winter. The<br>tradition of wassailing was widespread right up until the end<br>of the Second World War. Since 1991 (the year of Slovenia’s<br>independence) the tradition has begun to be revived and it is now<br>possible to talk about a new phase in its development.<br></p><p><strong>Epiphany Blessing of Homes</strong><br></p><p>One of the rituals or customs surrounding Christmas and<br>New Year celebrations involves the blessing of homes. After<br>the priest blesses a home with a prayer, incense and holy<br>water, he traditionally chalks or otherwise inscribes the letters<br>“GMB”, along with the number of the new year, on the gate<br>or front door. These letters represent the names of the Three<br>Kings, also known as the Magi or the Three Wise Men&#58; Gašer<br>(Caspar), Miha (Melchior) and Boltežr (Balthasar). The<br>inscription may also be written up by the householder. Recent<br>times have seen interesting innovations as regards this<br>blessed inscription, with some priests simply attaching to the<br>door or gate a sticker printed with a combination of the above<br>three letters and the year. As well as on the doors of houses<br>(or flats in the case of blocks of flats in cities), this blessing<br>also appears on the doors of farm buildings (such as barns<br>and stables) and work premises.</p><p>&#160;</p>Janez Bogataj