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Slovene Films - Vesna

Slovene Films - Vesna

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Datum izida:11/21/2013 11:00:00 PM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Scene from the film Vesna
Tisk:AS VABA MAA, Estonia
Izvedba:4-colour offset
Papir:Senator Natral Litho PVA GUM, 96 g /m2, gummed
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Zobčanje:comb 14 1/4 : 13 3/4
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Slovene Films - Vesna

<p>What is there to celebrate on the sixtieth anniversary of the<br>premiere of the film Vesna? Many things. The first Slovene<br>film comedy for example. Perhaps also Slovenia’s first real hit<br>film. The debut of Slovenia’s first homegrown film stars. Or the<br>first Slovene film by Czech director František Čáp, at that time<br>still “temporarily” based in Slovenia. Vesna was also the first<br>film, in the politicised climate of gloomy post-war Slovenia, to<br>deliberately turn away from revolutionary politics and dedicate<br>itself to a gentle reverie about young love. This provoked the<br>ire of many, including some Slovene film-makers, film critics<br>and “socio-political workers”, for several reasons&#58; Čáp was<br>a foreigner and was therefore accused of taking work away<br>from Slovene film-makers. Critics complained that there was<br>nothing Slovene about Vesna, and that it could have been set<br>anywhere in central Europe. Moreover the film did not show<br>even the slightest trace of the problems then faced by Slovenia<br>in the context of post-war Yugoslavia. Not only that but Vesna<br>was dangerously reminiscent of a Hollywood production. It is<br>true that Vesna was a kind of cinematic equivalent of Cockta,<br>Yugoslavia’s version of Coca-Cola. Despite the criticisms,<br>František Čáp fell in love with Slovenia and chose to remain in<br>the country. Over the course of 10 years he made 11 films, some<br>Slovene and others co-productions. He dedicated the last<br>10 years of his life, until his death in 1972, to raising chickens.<br>Enforced critical and political conformity is (was), of course, not<br>only a Slovene phenomenon, and it is interesting that Čáp was<br>actually the first to show in a film – Moments of Decision (1955)<br>– how to overcome this enforced conformity. Not only that, in<br>this film he even hinted at a way to overcome a Slovene trauma<br>that is still unresolved today&#58; the split between Partisans and<br>the Home Guard. Be that as it may, Vesna represented a turning<br>point and cinemagoers loved it.<br></p><p><em>Dr. Igor Koršič</em></p>