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Common Cuttlefish

Common Cuttlefish

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Datum izida:9/26/2013 10:00:00 PM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Common Cuttlefish
Tisk:Cartor Security Printing S. A., Francija
Izvedba:4-colour offset in sheets of 25 stamps + thermography with sea salt
Papir:102 gms gummed
Velikost:
Zobčanje:Harrow 13 : 13 1/4
Ilustracija:Matjaž Učakar
Fotografija:
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Common Cuttlefish

<p>The cuttlefish belongs to the class Cephalopoda, which means<br>that its feet grow from its head. It has ten tentacles on its head<br>– eight short ‘arms’ and two longer tentacles – which it uses to<br>seize its prey. Because its tentacles grow from a muscular foot,<br>the cuttlefish also uses its shorter tentacles for walking. </p><p>All the tentacles are lined with suckers. Placed among the </p><p>tentacles is&#160;the mouth, with a jaw reminiscent of a parrot’s </p><p>beak, which the cuttlefish uses to tear its prey. </p><p>&#160;</p><p>The cuttlefish has prominent, large and extremely well </p><p>developed eyes reminiscent of those of a goat. </p><p>Slightly separated from the head is the body or mantle, </p><p>of a flattened, goblet-like shape. On the dorsal side,<br>below the mantle, is the characteristic cuttlebone. This is a<br>vestigial shell. The body is fringed by swimming membrane,<br>which the cuttlefish uses to swim forwards. On the ventral<br>side is the funnel, which is connected to the mantle cavity. </p><p>&#160;</p><p>By squeezing water through the funnel, the cuttlefish can </p><p>swim backwards. The internal organs are located inside the </p><p>mantle cavity&#58; feathery gills, the digestive, excretory and </p><p>reproductive organs, and the characteristic ink sac. In the </p><p>case of danger, the cuttlefish squirts ink into the water </p><p>through the funnel and, in the resulting black cloud, hides </p><p>from its enemies and swims away to safety.</p><p><br>Its body is up to 40 cm long. The upper part of the body is a<br>marbled grey-brown colour, while the lower part is white. The </p><p>skin is rich in special pigment cells known as chromatophores </p><p>which allow the cuttlefish to adapt its colouring to the </p><p>background.</p><p>&#160;</p><p>Authors&#58; Vanja Bončina and Valter Žiža<br></p>