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The Letter

The Letter

0 €
Datum izida:9/23/2010 10:00:00 PM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar after Janez Šubic painting
Motiv:Letter
Tisk:Oriental Security Printing Solutions
Izvedba:
Papir:GSM102 g/m2
Velikost:
Zobčanje:Comb 13 1/4 : 13
Ilustracija:
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The Letter

<p>The Letter by Janez Šubic (National Gallery, Ljubljana; oil on canvas 20.5 x 23.5 cm, Inv. No NG S 433) is an excellent example of a work by an exploring artist, who from a realist starting point created an intimate study for a portrait of his cousin Ivan. The work displays harmony of tone, light and colour values, where the figure, depicted with an easy freedom, is identified with the role of light. This 1878 image is an eloquent testimony to the artist's understanding of the contemporary exploration of light. The latter actually dissolves the sharp outlines of the tangible world, and in this way the artist orients himself more decisively towards modernism.</p><p>&#160;</p><p>Janez Šubic (1850–1889) and his brother Jurij, five years his junior, were among the first and most important painters of Slovene Realism. They received their early training in their father Štefan's respected image-painting workshop in Poljanska Dolina. They continued their painting studies with J. Wolf in Šentvid, near Ljubljana. Janez then went to study in Venice and, in 1874, won first prize for his composition The Last Moments of Raphael. He was a pupil and collaborator of the celebrated Viennese painter Hans Makart. During the holidays he returned home and helped in his father's workshop, which explains his altar paintings and frescoes are to be found in churches in the former province of Carniola. His painting St Martin Healing a Sick Woman (1876) in Šmartin below Šmarna Gora is particularly remarkable. In 1884 he took up a position as professor of decorative painting in Kaiserlautern in Germany and accepted a commission to paint the museum there. He also painted the hall of the Provincial Museum (today the National Museum) in Ljubljana. With his brother Jurij, he was a pioneer of Slovene book illustration.</p><p>&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160; </p><p>Ferdinand Šerbelj<br></p>