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Olive Fruit Fly

Olive Fruit Fly

0 €
Datum izida:9/18/2003 8:08:00 AM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Olive Blossom
Tisk:DELO Tiskarna, d. d., Ljubljana
Izvedba:4-colour offset
Papir:Chancellor oba free, L. S. PVA 102 g/m2
Velikost:
Zobčanje:Comb
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Olive Fruit Fly

<b>Olive (Olea europaea L.)</b><p> The olive is one of the oldest cultivated fruits. While there is no doubt that wild olive trees existed in pre-history, it is believed that the origin of the cultivated olive tree dates back to 6,000 years B.C. Regarded as a symbol of peace, wisdom, victory and divine illumination, the sacred olive tree has been venerated since ancient times.In Slovenia olive growing developed to a noteworthy extent under the Venetian Republic and reached its peak in the last decades of the 19th century. After the devastating frost of 1929, the production decreased considerably. Efforts to revive it began in the 1980s. When we speak of olive growing in Slovenia, it is the Slovenian Istria olive growing areas that we have in mind. Olive oils produced in Slovenia have a characteristic aroma and a more advantageous combination of fatty acids than the oils produced from olives growing in more southern regions. The rewards of a diet using olives were recognized as early as the days of Hippocrates, the father of medicine, who knew the health and therapeutic benefits of olive oil. The consumption of a spoonful of oil was a common practise for many people.Olive tree produces clusters of 10 to 25 small white flowers. Depending on the variety and climate conditions, olives bloom from mid-May to mid-June. Most olive varieties are self-sterile and require cross-pollination by another variety to get a good crop set.&quot;Istrska belica&quot; is most widely spread olive variety in Slovenian Istria. It is somewhat resistant to cold, bears heavily and has a good oil yield. The fruit ripens late (from mid-November to mid-December) and is rather large in size. It turns from light green to dark red and finally to almost black colour. The tree bears heavily and regularly. It is grown chiefly for oil, which has fresh, bitter and spicy taste, and is good for mixing with light oils of other varieties. The olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae Gmel.) is considered the most damaging pest of olives. It has the potential to damage up to 100 percent of an olive crop. In Slovene climatic conditions, two to three generations of flies occur yearly. The adult fly is approximately 5 mm long, yellow brown in colour with a white triangular shaped spot located to the rear of the thorax. It has large green eyes. Each female lays between 200 and 300 eggs in a lifetime, usually one in each fruit. These hatch into very tiny larvae (maggots) which feed throughout the olive. Feeding damage may cause premature fruit drop and yield reduction.