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Slovenia's Entry Into the Schengen Zone

Slovenia's Entry Into the Schengen Zone

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Datum izida:11/23/2007 9:01:00 AM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Symbolic Depiction of the Removal of Border Controls
Tisk:Poštovní tiskárna cenin, Praha
Izvedba:4-colour offset
Papir:Tullis Russell 102 g/m2, gummed
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Zobčanje:Comb 11 3/4 : 11 1/4
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Slovenia's Entry Into the Schengen Zone

<b>Slovenia's Entry Into the Schengen Zone</b><p>The &quot;great&quot; Schengen Agreement was signed in a small village of Schengen in Luxembourg in 1985 by five European Community Member States (Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany and France) eager to strengthen police and customs cooperation and to facilitate the movement of goods and people by eliminating long waiting times at border crossings. Ten years later, the ten signatory countries together with Portugal and Spain created the so-called &quot;Schengen area&quot;, abolishing the checks at internal borders between the participating countries. The area was progressively extended to include other EU Member States (Austria, Greece and Italy joined in 1997, Finland and Sweden in 2001) and non-EU countries (Iceland and Norway). <p>The fundamental idea of Schengen is ensuring the right to freely cross the internal borders. To counteract the abolition of the internal control checks, a series of &quot;compensatory measures&quot; were put in place, implementing stricter external border controls to stop illegal immigration, drug smuggling, human trafficking and other unlawful activities. These measures - aimed at combating terrorism and organised crime and at ensuring security in the Member States - include cross-border police co-operation, a common visa regime and the exchange of information among the participating countries through the Schengen Information System (SIS). <p>The 2007 expansion of the Schengen area is to include nine EU newcomers, including Slovenia (the border-free zone currently includes 15 countries). The expansion process is now completed and the final decision on Slovenia's accession to the Schengen zone is to be taken by the EU Council. Once Slovenia has entered the border-free zone, there will be no more border posts on Slovenia's borders with Austria, Italy and Hungary, while the border controls on the border with Croatia (becoming the external border of the Schengen system) will become stricter to comply with the Schengen external border control regime standards. <p>Dragutin Mate<p>Minister of the Interior