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Definitive stamps from the Fruits in Slovenia series

Definitive stamps from the Fruits in Slovenia series

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Datum izida:11/17/2006 8:40:00 AM
Oblikovanje:Matjaž Učakar
Motiv:Persimmon Flower, Persimmon Fruit, Flatid Planthopper (Metcalfa pruinosa Say)
Tisk:Druck: Poštovní tiskarna Cenin, Praha
Izvedba:4-colour offset
Papir:Tullis Russel fluo litho 100 g/m2
Velikost:
Zobčanje:Comb
Ilustracija:
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Definitive stamps from the Fruits in Slovenia series

<b>Kaki (Diospyrus kaki L.) </b><p>Kaki us a fruit tree from the family Diospyros. It originates from China, where over two thousand kinds were grown over centuries. Very early it was transferred to Japan and Korea, where additional kinds were grown. In the 14th century, kaki was supposed to be brought to Europe by Marco Polo and in the middle of the 18th century it was brought to America (California). In the world, it is known as kaki, in the Spanish speaking countries as caqui, and in Israel as Sharon fruit. In English language the name persimmon is also used, which originates from the Indian name for the species Diospyrus virginiana that originates from the Eastern part of North America. Kaki favours the areas with moderate winters and mild summers. In Slovenia, it thrives the best in Istria and in the coastal area (Primorska), but more and more often it can be found anywhere that vine grows. It is also reported that it has been successfully grown at the edge of Ljubljana basin (Kamnik, Domžale). On the stamp, the Slovenian kaki is shown, which is darker from the imported ones due to antocyanin content. Kaki is a single-stemmed or multi-stemmed deciduous tree. It reaches the height up to 8 m with its crown about the same width. The branches are fairly brittle and can be damaged by a somewhat stronger wind. The oval leaves are set in an alternating manner. First, they are pale yellow-green, later they become shiny green. In moderate autumn, they become yellow, orange and red. From fresh and dry leaves, tea can be prepared. Small flowers, surrounded by green cup-like leaves, are grown in leaf axils from one-year old wood. Female flowers are single and cream-coloured, while the male flowers are coloured pink. On a branchlet, there are typically one to five flowers. Female flowers grow singly, while male flowers usually grow in groups of three. Kaki trees are either male or female, however some have both kinds of flowers. On male plants, occasionally perfect bisexual flowers appear that produce an atypical fruit. There also exist trees with all types of flowers. A tree's sexual expression can vary from year to another. Bees or other insects do the pollination, because the flowers are a good source of nectar, but also pollination by wind is possible. Many kinds are parthenocarpic (setting seedless fruit without pollination), even though some climates require pollination. Depending on the kind, the fruits come in different sizes and shapes. They can be classified into two groups. In the first group, the ripe fruits have firm flesh and have no astringent flavour. They can be eaten like apples and if they are left to soften, they taste even better. They are of middle size with oval or square shape and are similar to a tomato. The colour varies from light orange to dark orange-red. They can be stored in a cool place for two to four months. The second group includes the kinds, the fruits of which have to fully ripen; otherwise their flesh is astringent and tasteless. Only after the flesh becomes gelatinous, they are ripe and useful. The kaki's fruits are rich with glucose and other sugars, and they also contain some proteins and vitamins. It has been determined that they have medicinal effects, especially concerning the digestive system. Kaki is relatively problem-free, even though some pests can be harmful. More than a decade ago, one of the pests became also the citrus flatid planthopper (Metcalfa pruinosa Say). It is yellow-green and brown or even black. Usually, it is covered with a white, waxy material, which gives it a white-gray or blue-green appearance. It has two large wings that form a kind of a roof over its 6 to 13 mm long body. In spring, the pupae hatch from the eggs that pass the winter. They are wingless and covered with waxy threads similar to wool. They feed individually or in flights with soft sprouts and can ruin young plants or cause withered state at the adult plants. The adult citrus flatid planthoppers appear in June or July and remain till autumn. The eggs are